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Disaster Relief Resources

Hurricane Harvey.  Mexico Earthquake. Hurricane Maria. Western Wildfires. Hurricane Florence.  Hurricane Michael. Tulane University and New Orleans are all too familiar with the challenges that communities face in the aftermath of disasters.  Tulane University and New Orleans also know the impact that committed, compassionate volunteers and community members can have on recovery initiatives when they work together on a common goal.

Donate
Sending money is almost always the most efficient way to help in a disaster. Here are a few organizations accepting donation to support communities affected by disasters.

 

North Carolina

The North Carolina Disaster Relief Fundis currently accepting contributions for Hurricane Florence damage. Contributions will help with immediate unmet needs of Hurricane Florence victims. Contributions are made online by secure link after you submit the webform.

TheFood Bank of Central & Eastern Carolina is a nonprofit organization that provides food for people at risk of hunger in 34 counties.  The Food Bank serves a network of more than 800 partner agencies in Druham, Greenville, New Bern, Raleigh, Sandhills, and Wilmington.

South Carolina

The One SC Fund provides grants to nonprofits to fund relief, recovery and/or rebuilding assistance programs from state-declared emergencies. Former Governor Nikki Haley- with the help of Central Carolina Community Foundation and a team of South Carolinians from entertainment, business and public service-announced the One SC Fund in November 2015 after the 2015 Thousand Year Flood touched South Carolinians from every walk of life.

Charleston Animal Society sent a team to Myrtle Beach on September 11, 2018 to evacuate 42 dogs out of harm’s way. More assistance is being planned for animals in other parts of South Carolina that need help.

Educate

United Way’s 2-1-1 is a free hotline that provides information to individuals seeking community resources like shelter, food and water, recovery support, and other basic needs, before, during and after disasters. The service is available in 180 languages 24/7 by simply dialing 2-1-1 or visiting 211.org.

Individuals who need assistance ahead of, during, and after disasters can contact 211 by simply dialing 211 from a cell phone or landline. 2-1-1 is a free, 24/7, hotline, available in many languages, that provides information to individuals seeking community resources like shelter, food and water, recovery support, and other basic needs, before, during and after disasters. More information about 2-1-1 can be found at 211.org.

Looking for more information?

NY Times

USA Today

South Carolina Emergency Management Division

Volunteer

Interested in volunteering?  Do not “self-deploy.” This could create an additional burden for emergency workers. Rather, volunteer with established organizations. These organizations have worked with local communities to identify needs and developed resources to support volunteers in this work. Likewise, many of the areas hardest hit by disaster might not be immediately ready for volunteers. Be patient. Disaster recovery is a long process.

All Hands and Hearts

Harvest Hope Food Bank (Columbia, SC)

Red Cross

United Way of South Carolina>